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Discrimination -- Hostility

Hostility towards Jews grew with the Depression, unemployment, and the rise of Nazism in Europe.


Image of American icons and anti-Semitism
Americans icons and heroes such as George Washington were used to encourage Americans to control or eliminiate alleged Jewish influences, associating discrimination with an implied patriotism.
American icons and anti-Semitism
Courtesy Life, March 6, 1939. Courtesy Daniel and Lois Fermaglich
 
Image of Jewmockracy Roosevelt -- Anti-Jewish feelings coincided with distrust of liberalism, labor organizations, Roosevelt's New Deal, and the inclusion of Jews in public life. Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt were criticized for being influenced by Jews, and some called Franklin's New Deal a "Jew" Deal.
Jewmockracy
Courtesy Life, March 6, 1939. Courtesy Lois and Daniel Fermaglich
 
Image of Protest against Henry Ford A protest against Henry Ford, whose publication supported themes of Jewish conspiracy and influence.
Protest against Henry Ford  
Image of Roosevelt as Jew Image of Posters like this encouraged Americans to buy from, vote for, and employ gentiles (non-Jews)
Roosevelt as Jew
Courtesy Life magazine, March 6, 1939. Courtesy Lois and Daniel Fermaglich
Posters like this encouraged Americans to buy from, vote for, and employ gentiles (non-Jews).
Courtesy Archives of Labor and Urban Affairs, University Archives, Wayne State University
Image of Headline compiled by Life magazine These cartoons and headlines compiled by Life magazine exposed the growth of the Nazi movement in America. Jews were portrayed as un-Christian, un-American, and racially different.
Headline compiled by Life magazine
Courtesy Life, March 6, 1939. Courtesy Lois and Daniel Fermaglich.
 

Image of Headline compiled by Life magazine 2
Image of Headline compiled by Life magazine 3
Headline compiled by Life magazine.
Courtesy Life Magazine, March 6, 1939. Courtesy Lois and Daniel Fermaglich.
Headline compiled by Life magazine
Courtesy Life magazine, March 6, 1939. Courtesy Lois and Daniel Fermaglich.
Image of Nazi flag from Detroit Nazi supporters grew in number in Michigan and elsewhere. This Nazi flag was discovered in Detroit after Pearl Harbor.
Nazi flag from Detroit
Courtesy Life, August 17, 1942. Courtesy Lois and Daniel Fermaglich.
 
Image of Ku Klux Klan in Michigan Established in 1931, Michigan's Black Legion, with roots in the Ku Klux Klan, targeted Jews in southeastern Michigan. The Legion also focused on Blacks, Catholics, welfare workers, and labor unionists. Black Legion membership numbered nearly 30,000; one-third lived in the Detroit area.
Ku Klux Klan in Michigan
Courtesy Information: Thomas L. Jones, Detroit News web