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Michigan State University Museum Fabric Reproductions

The Michigan State University Museum has collaborated with RJR Fashion Fabrics of Torrance, California, to create two lines of fabric that reproduce or are close variations of fabrics found in quilts of the MSU Museum collections. Great Lakes, Great Quilts: Quilt Fabric Reproductions from the Michigan State University Museum, released in 2001, was drawn from several quilts in the collection. Trip Around the World: Reproductions from the Michigan State University Museum, released in 2002, showcase the fabrics used by Laura May Clarke of Detroit, Michigan, in her 1932 “Trip Around the World” quilt.

   
Reproduction
Photo of reproduction of the Fleur-de-Lis Album quilt
Fleur-de-Lis Album Quilt
Members of the Capitol City Quilt Guild, hand appliquers; Beth Donaldson, piecer and designer; Kari Ruedisale, machine quilter
2001
Lansing, Ingham County, Michigan
Cotton with cotton/polyester batting
100” x 100”
MSUM Teaching Collection TC2001:7

The Capitol City Quilt Guild was started in 1984, the same year the Michigan Quilt Project (MQP) inventory was launched. When the call went out for quilters to hand appliqué the blocks for this reproduction quilt on a tight deadline, these members of the Capitol City Quilt Guild took up the challenge: Marti Caterino, Pat Clark, Lennie Rathbun, Marie Van Tilburg, Beth Donaldson, Kate Edgar, Mary Edgar, Jackie Shulsky, Mary Hausauer, Nancy Johnston, Dorothy Jones, Jan Gagliano, Linda Kuhlman, Mary Hutchins, Phyllis O’Connor, Fran Mort, Carol Seamon, and Jan Quinn.

In this reproduction version of the original unfinished top, Donaldson added the double Sawtooth pattern border and increased the size of the unfinished quilt.

Original
Photo of original Fleur-de-lis album quilt top

This quilt only appears in the exhibit as an image on a text panel.

Fleur-de-Lis Album Quilt Top
Maker unknown
1855
Found in Battle Creek, Calhoun County, Michigan
Cotton
80” x 80”
MSUM 2000:58.1

According to information given by the individual from whom the quilt top was acquired, the original quilt top came from the estate of 107-year-old Mary Haley, an African-American who lived in Battle Creek, Michigan. However, subsequent research by the MSUM staff reveals that it is more probable that the quilt top was from the estate of Battle Creek resident Olga Haley who died at the age of 104. Her mother, Mary Haley, was born in Kent City, Michigan, in 1837 and died in 1964.

   
ReproductionPhoto of reproduction of the Duck's in the Pond quilt Duck’s in the Pond Quilt
Mary Worrall, designer;
Kate Edgar, piecer;
Kari Ruedisale, machine quilter
2001
East Lansing, Ingham County, Michigan
Cotton with cotton/polyester batting
89” x 101”
MSUM Teaching Collection TC2001:10

The original “Ducks in the Pond” quilt is easily datable through its colors and prints, such as the madders and purples common to the 1870s. Piecer Kate Edgar chose reproduction fabrics in her own collection to create an ever “scrappier” quilt than the pattern suggests.

Quilters often find that if they do not purchase a piece of fabric when they first notice it available for sale, the fabric soon sells out and becomes unavailable. Keeping a “stash” or a variety of fabrics on hand allows quilters to have a wide choice of palettes and prints to work with.

   
OriginalPhoto of original Ducks in the Pond quilt

This quilt only appears in the exhibit as an image on a text panel.
Ducks in the Pond
Mary E. Beardslee Durkee
ca. 1870
Cotton
78” x 92”
MSUM 1999:12.6
Gift of Betty Quarton Hoard
Durkee-Blakslee-Quarton-Hoard Collection

Donor Betty Quarton Hoard’s grandmother, Mary E. Beardslee Durkee, pieced this quilt with fabrics from the family dry goods store in Birmingham, Michigan. Betty recalls that the boxes of fabrics, lace, and other notions that were available from the family’s store always provided her with scraps from which to make doll clothes. Because the family did not use the quilt, its colors remain bright.

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